Vancouver flooding: Evacuees plead for more supplies

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Kim Haakstad of Vancouver Life newspaper helped distribute supplies to low-income people. “If we didn’t have centres we could go to all day, every day” , evacuees in…

Vancouver flooding: Evacuees plead for more supplies

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Kim Haakstad of Vancouver Life newspaper helped distribute supplies to low-income people.

“If we didn’t have centres we could go to all day, every day” , evacuees in Vancouver said of their relief supplies.

Heavy rain caused a number of landslides and some river rises, causing widespread flooding in Metro Vancouver in British Columbia.

Major highways including Highway 1 were closed, and people were forced to evacuate.

The areas affected include Vancouver, New Westminster, Surrey, Richmond, Port Moody, Parksville, Maple Ridge, Ladner, Langley, and Delta.

Rescue crews are still dealing with rescues and with lost property, while people who live in areas affected by flooding are waiting for roads to reopen.

President Donald Trump weighed in via Twitter, in a pair of tweets at about 1600 local time: “Thank you to our Great State & Federal Partners for helping to provide Food, Water & Power to areas affected by floods and other disasters. Be safe!”

The president also called out first responders for their “dedication”.

Image copyright EPA Image caption Floral tributes are left on the shoulder of a passing motorcyclist at West Broadway Boulevard in Vancouver

Around 10,000 people were rescued on Thursday and Friday, and hundreds of schools and recreational facilities in the region cancelled classes and events because of flooding.

The province has declared a state of emergency, and has put $10m (£7.5m) of funding into the relief effort, including $1m for flood relief, $1m for debris clean-up and $500,000 for supporting first responders.

Key roads in the region remained closed because of flooding on Friday, including Highways 1 and 17, with a further six roads being closed because of landslides and landslides on Thursday.

The area is home to forest industry operations, coal mines, timber management areas, and shipping terminals.

Flooding and landslide caused serious disruption for many businesses, with shelves emptied in stores and consumer prices rising in some cases.

The Williams Lake Superstore on Friday displayed a handwritten sign that read: “This is a new way to refer to places where things are not available. Back in May.”

The huge area includes the town’s historic Fort Nelson, which led to the town declaring a state of emergency over the threat of landslides.

Fort Nelson town manager Bill Wood said it was too early to say what that meant, but hoped that the hotel that had stood for more than a century would be brought back into use.

“There is a lot of uncertainty right now,” he said.

“We want to get the community back to a sense of normalcy as soon as possible.”

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