‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’

Photo Before Tom Holland was a superhero in Spider-Man: Homecoming, he was just another 18-year-old, trying to fit in. That’s how he remembered his first Halloween, or rather, his first night out in NYC….

‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’

Photo

Before Tom Holland was a superhero in Spider-Man: Homecoming, he was just another 18-year-old, trying to fit in.

That’s how he remembered his first Halloween, or rather, his first night out in NYC. His experience started on the subway, where he and a few friends took turns sitting in the middle of a packed subway car. “I don’t know if you know this, but most of the time you can’t really move when a train is packed like that,” Holland said, “and it was literally me and three other people there at the time, and in all of a sudden the car just kind of just went silent, and you just felt kind of spaced out and it felt a little frightening.”

For a teen who was mostly a spectator in most of his hometown of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, the experience didn’t sit well. “I was definitely panicked. I was looking at the ceiling going ‘Where am I, where am I?’” he recalled. “I just went a little quiet.”

As Holland transitioned from kid to man, his social expectations changed. He said that, in all the places he’s visited, he was fascinated to have never heard of Broadway or theater. “It’s only in New York and even Europe where I’ve tried to hang out that there’s no understanding, no recognition of what this entertainment is or how big it is or that you’re part of the experience,” he said. “And I find that baffling.”

To the consternation of some of his pals and family, he vowed to keep his friends and family updated on his whereabouts in New York City. As he began to learn more about the city’s self-described “hybrid culture” (though he makes no mention of his home town), his family and friends became more agitated. Holland explained that he was becoming known as “that guy,” and he was being chastised.

“You’ve just done a show,” one of his relatives told him. “The show was called ‘Spider-Man.’ Are you not prepared to open that door? You’re 18. Don’t you know the importance of appearing in front of an audience?”

Holland’s experiences with sleep paralysis have also improved, to some degree. “It’s kind of like when you’re at the dinner table when there’s all these cooks and you try to get to the next thing and you get lost in the voice of the cook or how fast someone is talking,” he said.

“It’s like the same thing, but actually in the most unusual way,” he added. He gave himself a set amount of time to pass the time before going to sleep and allowing himself to see others in the room who were sleeping too.

One of the things that Holland’s “Saskatoon brain” wasn’t accustomed to doing was getting up and looking around when he woke up, so he didn’t know what was staring back at him. “You’re literally thinking this is just the morning,” he said. But to be honest, it was “awesome” to see the face of his friend Alex, who was walking by the bed next to him.

“I remember — still weird — watching him and thinking, ‘Oh my God. That’s his face?’” Holland said. “Now when I wake up and I’m just trying to work out who it is, it doesn’t bother me. I just wonder what he looks like.”

Holland’s stargazing experience has also changed because of post-production work for Spider-Man: Homecoming, which was released in theaters this week. “I’m like a kid at a dinner table. I get a spoon and see all these faces around me,” he said.

Read the full story on Refinery29.

Related

Watch: Watch Tom Holland grow up before our eyes as Spider-Man in newest Homecoming trailer

Did Marvel cut a scene between Peter Parker and May Parker in ‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’?

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ star Elisabeth Moss talks about watching Tom Holland as Spider-Man with her son

‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ star Tom Holland calls being in �

Leave a Comment