City Un-vaccinates Employees, is Sued for Discrimination

The City of Toronto was sued on Monday after it was determined that almost 250 city employees had not been vaccinated against a viral disorder called adenovirus, dubbed “CoV-19.” According to CTV, on March…

City Un-vaccinates Employees, is Sued for Discrimination

The City of Toronto was sued on Monday after it was determined that almost 250 city employees had not been vaccinated against a viral disorder called adenovirus, dubbed “CoV-19.”

According to CTV, on March 20, a vaccination clinic was held in the Annex neighborhood after a child received the vaccine at Toronto’s Baycrest Health Sciences and ended up testing positive for CoV-19.

Only patients who were over the age of 12 years old were offered the vaccine at the clinic, which put more than 200 local and municipal employees in a hard spot.

The Toronto Health Officer, Dr. Eileen de Villa, told CTV that although the officials never investigated the legality of the clinic, it was still considered illegal because of the facility’s age limits, and therefore cannot offer vaccinations for that kind of age group.

After the clinic, a city employee on a focus group about Toronto’s services went to the CBC and was able to find a lobbyist who goes to clinic to offer the vaccinations to anyone who wanted them.

After analyzing the case, the Health Department stated that the clinic actually qualifies as an “associate” clinic and as such, the city will be allowing these employees to continue with their daily duties and return to work when they obtain their vaccinations.

The lawsuit is just one of several efforts made by the Ontario Human Rights Commission to protect the rights of Toronto residents by ensuring that mandated vaccinations are carried out in accordance with the rules and regulations of the province.

The lawsuit stems from a previously held agreement, where Health Canada grants the province the authority to provide free vaccinations for residents, with the rules and regulations being determined by the province. But this particular case was in violation of the agreement and required the province to fulfill the wishes of employees.

“The suit will attempt to convince a court that the City of Toronto, with regulatory and permitting authority, should not be allowed to exempt employees from Ontario’s Constitutionally mandated vaccination requirements,” says the lawsuit.

Most Ontario residents must show proof of a vaccination of any sort, including vaccinations for measles, mumps, rubella, pneumococcal disease, polio and the influenza virus.

The city, on the other hand, is only required to offer “mandatory immunizations,” which must be administered at government-sponsored clinics for children as of the birthdate specified.

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