Canada’s oldest open space is an ocean of greenspace for over 100 species

An epic neighborhood in Canada grew out of a heap of garbage. The Miramichi Ponds, located on the Northumberland Strait, are nearly two-hundred acres of clean water reclaimed from landfill and safely reinhabited by…

Canada’s oldest open space is an ocean of greenspace for over 100 species

An epic neighborhood in Canada grew out of a heap of garbage.

The Miramichi Ponds, located on the Northumberland Strait, are nearly two-hundred acres of clean water reclaimed from landfill and safely reinhabited by more than 100 freshwater species, including white sturgeon, dragonflies, and dragonflies, along with otters, insects, and other wildlife.

With more than 2000 species identified, the Miramichi Ponds is one of North America’s largest wildlife refuges.

How did the Miramichi Ponds develop?

The Miramichi Ponds were created in the early 1900s when the land being pushed into nearby the town of Miramichi in New Brunswick, Canada was “extracted” for industrial use by an engineering company, which redirected the Industrial Contracting Company’s equipment directly into the water.

Around the time of this industrial cleansing, the local farms began to burn tires and the area had begun to accumulate about 27 million tonnes of garbage.

With the area preserved, visitors of the Miramichi Ponds are treated to stunning views of wetlands, mangroves, pine trees, and, of course, clean water.

What does this area do for the environment?

These pristine greenspaces were created to conserve an ecological ecosystem that supports a myriad of fish and aquatic species along with more than 100 freshwater and marine species, including seabirds, marsh frogs, and water birds, such as sandhill cranes.

Studies indicate the Miramichi Ponds is a strong source of biodiversity not only for the area, but also for the region. Researchers found that human habitats along the shoreline support a much more diverse biological portfolio than the neighboring area, whose native plants were overharvested by humans, making it vulnerable to the effects of invasive species.

For more information on the Miramichi Ponds, please visit the Miramichi Ponds website.

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