Are those protests against Tysons really about street parking?

“I live and work downtown and hate having to travel up Rock Creek Park to get to Brookland, Germantown, or the Takoma Mall. Only a park would preserve the character of the single family…

Are those protests against Tysons really about street parking?

“I live and work downtown and hate having to travel up Rock Creek Park to get to Brookland, Germantown, or the Takoma Mall. Only a park would preserve the character of the single family community. Besides, if anyone bothered to think it through they would realize that taking away that open space from housing would also create a massive increase in the number of intersections to cross and the time required to get from our house to work, school, or the neighborhood grocery. Our household has spent over $1,500 in the last year to send our son to school out of district because of this traffic. Our family members seem to work out of the park too, which should be a daily reminder that we are not using it for parks. That would cause traffic in the office even more. Why wouldn’t the others just give up and move out if this was the desire of the neighbors?”

— Howard Almes, a Baltimore resident

“I currently live in downtown DC, on H Street. I love this district, and view it as a beacon of affordability, innovation, and beauty. I live in the middle of things, around 5th and H; it’s just fun to walk there. With a 45-minute drive to work, I never like having to get out of the car, but you gotta do what you gotta do. Currently I commute into work because that is what I love to do: talk with my friends in the same neighborhood, lunch at the market on H, and late-night bar hopping in Dupont Circle. I rarely travel to Millenia because the area around there is just too gentrified. Seems like to me that would be one of the negatives of putting a mall like Tysons across H Street, even if it’s more square footage.”

— Katherine Mirsky, a Washington resident

“DC is booming with early 20’s millennials. In fact, that’s a new phenomenon in DC, where baby boomers have begun their zombie-walking, symbolic counter-revolution. Despite appearances, millennials are still young and unmarried. They have no kids, spouses, or children to send to D.C. public schools. Sadly, only part of the population can afford to live close to work, and many workers live in Southwest and Hampden to get to work in the morning. Most of the Tysons ‘whales’ are in the District already. . . . If they wanted to live on the waterfront, they would live in Outer Southeast or Columbia Heights, where homeowners enjoy DC’s civic affairs culture.”

—Mike O’Brien, MD, an academic board certified anesthesiologist in DC

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